Ever-Changing Talks The Innovations In The Music Industry

Ever-Changing Talks The Innovations In The Music Industry

cover_catcher_01

I feel the music business has drastically changed
for the better in the past 15 years and there are many more chances/opportunities for the independent artist. Now that technology has evolved the independent musician has a chance to get their music out to the world.

Live interview 

Episode #381 http://www.blogtalkradio.com/avaliveradio/2016/11/01/episode-381-ava-live-radio-behind-the-music-with-jacqueline-jax

Jacqueline Jax logo photoGETTING TO KNOW EVER-CHANGING
by Jacqueline Jax host of A.V.A Live Radio

Brie and Aaron Jamison,

EVER-CHANGING @SterlingScripts is our instagram ID and our website is SterlingScripts.com

I feel the music business has drastically changed
for the better in the past 15 years and there are many more chances/opportunities for the independent artist. Now that technology has evolved the independent musician has a chance to get their music out to the world.

The pros: Music has helped me to put into words how I am feeling,
it has helped me to relate to others and feel a real connection. Music carries memories; its the feelings you hold close; it hold all that nostalgia you can’t seem to shake; those nights spent on the porch. The great thing about the music industry today is that bands can publish their music online, and connect with anyone. The cons: It can be tough to find musicians to work with in my location.

It’s the ying and yang of life.
You can’t have a triumph without struggle. Struggle builds character, it helps you to grow.

The Dalai Lama, I think it is pretty obvious,
I have questions that only he can answer—about the universe and life and perspective.

I played clarinet in 3rd grade—I played for three years.
Everyday I would hear my teacher say, “ Briannnaaa, your clarinet is at the front office—your mother brought it!.” I wanted to be like Benny Goodman. 3/4.

Baseball’s My Game

Purchase item: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/everchanging2

It’s a baseball song.
There is only a couple classic baseball songs out there—Take Me Out to the Ball Game and Put Me in Coach. I want to communicate the feeling of a nostalgic, authentic baseball experience, and do justice to his story. I want to show how much his story affected me, and the great memories I have of him. I thought the best way to connect with others and my grandfather, was through music. It’s also a song that goes with a movie script called Minor
Chances. My mother, Dawn Brown, wrote the screenplay about my grandfather’s experience in Baseball’s minor leagues in the 1930s and 40s. My husband, Aaron Jamison, is a musician, and he along with two of our friends Max Rosenlicht on drums and James Maher on some of the lyrics and guitar, they all composed the music together.

pg_ic

I live in a small pirate-town.
We have a bar that has some bands play there a sometimes.